Japan’s Wisteria Flower Tunnel Is Like Walking Through A Rainbow

 

This isn’t a Monet painting—it’s a photograph.
It shows a flower tunnel at The Kawachi Fuji Gardens, a private garden on rural Kyushu Island in southern Japan. The garden is open to the public for only a few months a year.

 

 

The garden includes 20 different species of wisteria plants, but the wisteria tunnel is the garden’s prime spot. The pastel passageway looks like something straight out of a fairytale when the flowers are in bloom—all you need are roaming unicorns to complete the picture.

 

 

In the Buddhist religion, wisteria is a symbol of prayer. The Chinese flower is a member of the pea family and is known for its climbing vines and winding branches. The plants can climb as high as 65 feet above ground and can spread 32 feet laterally, according to University of Florida’s Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants. The flowers bloom in lavender, violet, pink and white.

 

 

Visit in late April or early May to experience the full magic of the tunnel. Try to go during the “Fuji Matsuri” (“Wisteria Festival”) when the tunnel is in full bloom.

Rainbows are actually circules not arcs 🌈

It’s possible to see the whole circle of a rainbow – but sky conditions have to be just right. Plus you have to be up high.


When sunlight and raindrops combine to make a rainbow, they can make a whole circle of light in the sky. But it’s a very rare sight. Sky conditions have to be just right for this, and even if they are, the bottom part of a full-circle rainbow is usually blocked by your horizon. That’s why we see rainbows not as circles, but as arcs across our sky.


When you see a rainbow, notice the height of the sun. It helps determine how much of an arc you’ll see. The lower the sun, the higher the top of the rainbow. If you could get up high enough, you’d see that some rainbows continue below the horizon seen from closer to sea-level. Mountain climbers sometimes see more of a full-circle rainbow, though even a high mountain isn’t high enough to show you the whole circle.
Pilots do sometimes report seeing genuine full-circle rainbows. They’d be tough to see out the small windows we passengers look through, but pilots have a much better view from up front.