The Charm Abandoned Places

Abandoned Ottmanic Train Trailer, Saudia Arabia Desert.

I have something for abandoned places. There is something both eerie and striking about them they truly charm me. Whether it’s a train cemetery in Bolivia or an Art Deco subway station underneath New York City, each location is a snapshot of history frozen in time. Take a tour of these mesmerizing sites around the world—stark reminders of what used to be, yes, but with beauty seeping through the broken glass and dust.

Valle dei Mulini (Valley of the Mills), Sorrento, Italy

Such places bring me into a silent and forgotten world, into places that was once lively and crowded. I’ve always wondered whether if any of the places we use now will be that charming when they’re left abandoned 1000 years from now. I think countries that has such beautiful abandoned buildings must maintain them and protect them.

Power Station, Belgium

The whistling of the wind penetrating into broken windows and doors, the sounds from surrounding nature are just magical for me at least.  I would not hesitate to roam the world if I had time, searching for abandoned sites, sanctuaries where time seems to have stopped after humans have evacuated them. Here I post captivating and melancholic images of abandoned places from all around the world.

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This Piece of Nostalgia From the 1940’s Was Meant to Be a Vision of the Future

The Bike of the Past

Looking back at the past century, people really enjoyed constructing futuristic models of automobiles. It was almost like companies could picture what cars would look like decades to come. But little did we know that bicycles were also being conceptualized far into the future.

It was 1946, and Benjamin Bowden had a spark of inspiration. “Just by sitting down in my office and thinking about it, I said to myself I should select a product that had not been made before,” he stated. As a result, he designed and assembled a bike that he called the Classic, later changing it to the more appropriate name, the Spacelander.

The lightweight Spacelander included a small motor for uphill travel, something that other bikes at that time didn’t have. The bike’s design was also novel in that its design represented what a bicycle twenty years into the future might look like. Ironically, it didn’t go on sale in the U.S. until approximately two decades later.

Although futuristic, the design was quite simple. How a simple pedal bicycle had a steel frame and two wheels, Bowden’s prototype had the same concept, just with more sleek and abstract parts.

Made of fiberglass, this bicycle was designed by Benjamin Bowden, who helped create the Ford Mustang and T-Bird. Fewer than 1,000 Spacelander bicycles were ever produced. (Value: $13,000, courtesy of Toyraygun.com)

When it was finally released on the market, it sold for $90 ($730 in our modern time). Because of this, it wasn’t very popular, and only around 500 were ever produced.

The Bike of the Future

Although Bowden’s bike might look a little strange even for today’s standards, it still gives us a glimpse into the progression of bicycle design over time. Not to say that we don’t still see Schwinns that look pretty similar today in relation to what they looked like several decades ago.

But bike design and function are constantly evolving. Now, the ‘futuristic bike’ of our time could very well be the electric bicycle.

 

I am addicted to everything vintage its my ultimate fetish ! One day I will surely get the baby blue one ! It’s so irresistible for me.