The Charm Abandoned Places

Abandoned Ottmanic Train Trailer, Saudia Arabia Desert.

I have something for abandoned places. There is something both eerie and striking about them they truly charm me. Whether it’s a train cemetery in Bolivia or an Art Deco subway station underneath New York City, each location is a snapshot of history frozen in time. Take a tour of these mesmerizing sites around the world—stark reminders of what used to be, yes, but with beauty seeping through the broken glass and dust.

Valle dei Mulini (Valley of the Mills), Sorrento, Italy

Such places bring me into a silent and forgotten world, into places that was once lively and crowded. I’ve always wondered whether if any of the places we use now will be that charming when they’re left abandoned 1000 years from now. I think countries that has such beautiful abandoned buildings must maintain them and protect them.

Power Station, Belgium

The whistling of the wind penetrating into broken windows and doors, the sounds from surrounding nature are just magical for me at least.  I would not hesitate to roam the world if I had time, searching for abandoned sites, sanctuaries where time seems to have stopped after humans have evacuated them. Here I post captivating and melancholic images of abandoned places from all around the world.

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The Beautiful Tree of Italy: Alberbello

Alberobello (Italian: means literally “beautiful tree”) is a small town and comune of the metropolitan city of Bari, Apulia, southern Italy. It has about 10,700 inhabitants and is famous for its unique trullo buildings. The trulli of Alberobello have been designated as a UNESCO World Heritage site since 1996.

Alberobello was first mentioned in the early 16th century when the first 40 families were granted land to farm in the area. The abundance of calcareous sedimentary material in the area lead to the building of houses with dry stone without the use of mortar. These houses were the first trulli which contributed to the expansion of the settlement. Building the houses of dry stone was a requirement of Count Giangirolamo II as in this way it was avoidable to pay taxes on them. (Source)

There are so many hidden jewels in Italy much more than what is marketed, I personally discovered many charming towns and destinations by chance when doing road trips. Alberobello was one of these findings. located on the heel of the shoe (Italy map), It is 5 hours drive from Rome by car probably 3 hours from Naples.

 

The town is small, most of its old houses are renovated and turned into hotels or tourists markets. Only couple of houses are left untouched to preserve the town history.

Alberobello and its surroundings is definitely a relaxing/sightseeing place, after sunset there is nothing much to do other than dinner and for me specially in that town was enough as their cuisine was amazing. While before sunset your day should be packed with activities according to your taste. The hotels there are pretty much the same in terms of exterior/interior design. If I was asked to recommend one it would be Il Gabellota Resort .

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